NCAA can't keep tournament games away from legal gambling
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NCAA can't keep tournament games away from legal gambling

In this photograph taken with a fisheye lens, the exterior view of Capital One Arena is seen, Saturday, March 16, 2019, in Washington. As the NCAA prepares to stage its first basketball championships since the Supreme Court allowed legal sports betting in any state that wants it, the organization remains opposed to gambling on its events. But it's not denying reality, either. The NCAA had a longtime ban on bringing its championships to places where gambling on sports was legal. That was suspended last year in the wake of the Supreme Court decision. This year, three women's games will be played in Mississippi, where people have been betting on college sports since last summer, and men's games will be played in Washington at Capital One Arena, which could have a full-service onsite sportsbook by this time next year under a new law. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

WASHINGTON — The NCAA is still opposed to gambling on its events even as sports betting spreads ahead of March Madness. But the governing body for college sports isn’t denying reality, either.

The NCAA Tournament starting this week is the first since the U.S. Supreme Court allowed legal sports betting to expand last year. That decision prompted the NCAA to suspend a longtime ban on bringing championships to places where sports wagers are legal.

Three games in the women’s NCAA Tournament will be played this weekend in Mississippi, where people have been betting on college sports since last summer. Capital One Arena in Washington will host Sweet 16 and Elite Eight games on the men’s side next week and could have a full-service onsite sportsbook by this time next year.

The NCAA is considering new rules but officials say they’re acknowledging they can’t avoid states with legal betting on sports.

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Ben Nuckols, The Associated Press


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