The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories - NEWS 95.7
Loading articles...

The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Last Updated Apr 7, 2017 at 6:40 pm ADT

Highlights from the news file for Friday, April 7

———

CANADA LOOPED IN ON AMERICAN MISSILE STRIKE: Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan received a briefing from his American counterpart about an hour before American warships launched missiles against a Syrian airbase. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Sajjan in turn briefed him and Trudeau says he spoke to President Donald Trump by phone Friday morning. Trudeau told the House of Commons that the two leaders discussed the need for a “political solution” to the Syria crisis.

———

UN POLITICAL CHIEF URGES STRONG SYRIA MESSAGE: The United Nations political chief is urging the divided members of the Security Council to send a strong message after the chemical weapons attack in Syria “that any use of chemical weapons shall not be tolerated and will have consequences.” Jeffrey Feltman told an emergency council meeting Friday the council should unite on a resolution demanding an investigation of the attack that prompted U.S. airstrikes against the Assad government. He says the international community has a responsibility to hold all perpetrators accountable “and that chemical weapons are never again used as an instrument of warfare.”

———

CYCLONES PUT IN HANGERS: The military has grounded its fleet of CH-148 Cyclone helicopters after one of the choppers encountered a problem during a training flight. Officials say the helicopter landed safely but as a precaution the Cylones were grounded as of March 12 until tests can be run. The military says the existing fleet of aging Sea King helicopters will continue to provide maritime helicopter support for the navy. The military also temporarily grounded the Cyclones in January to check for potential tail rotor problems following an incident on a North Sea oil platform involving a civilian version of the helicopter.

———

BOOZE ON HOLD IN INTERNAL TRADE DEAL: The federal and provincial governments announced details of a new internal trade agreement which doesn’t include alcoholic beverages. Ontario Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid says a working group will study streamlining standards for alcohol and report back next year. The deal does lay the groundwork for talks to eventually establish a process to help provinces and territories regulate the trade of recreational pot.

———

SOFTWOOD TALKS APPEAR TO BE ON THE US BACKBURNER: Canada’s top negotiator in the softwood lumber trade dispute with the United States says talks on the issue have faded since President Donald Trump took office. Kirsten Hillman says the matter doesn’t appear to be front of mind for the Trump administration, which hasn’t put some of the key players in place to work on the file. Hillman says reaching a stable, predictable and fair agreement is one of the Canadian government’s top priorities. Hillman made the comments to industry members who had gathered in Vancouver to attend the Council of Forestry Industries’ annual convention.

———

JOBLESS RATE INCREASED IN MARCH: Canada’s unemployment rate inched up last month to 6.7 per cent, despite the job market creating another 19,400 net jobs. Statistics Canada says the jobless rate nonetheless rose because because more people were looking for work. The fresh data also showed a continued weakness in the key area of wage growth. On average, Canadian earners saw their pay increase 1.1 per cent over the last year — a period during which consumer prices climbed by about two per cent.

———

FOUR DEAD IN STOCKHOLM TRUCK ATTACK: Stockholm police have raised the toll in a beer truck attack to four dead, 15 wounded. The news comes as Swedish police launched a nationwide manhunt for the person or persons who drove a stolen beer truck down a pedestrian street in the Swedish capital and crashed it into a department store Friday afternoon. Stockholm police say one person “that can have some kind of connection” to the attack has been arrested.

———

CANADIANS WILL REMEMBER MAJOR MILESTONE SUNDAY: Millions of Canadians are expected to pause on Sunday to remember the battle of Vimy Ridge. It’s the 100th anniversary of the First World War battle in which thousands of Canadians died in France. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be in France, joining Prince Charles and sons William and Harry to honour those who died in the epic battle. For many, Vimy represents Canada’s transformation from a British colony to a country confident of its place in the world in what some call its coming of age as a nation.

———

HIGH HEELS OUT OF FASHION IN BC WORKPLACE: British Columbia’s government has barred employers from forcing women to wear high heels in the workplace. Labour Minister Shirley Bond says requiring women to wear high heels on the job is discriminatory and also a health and safety issue. The government is changing regulations to stop the mandatory practice.

———

BEARS WAKING UP IN BC: Bears are coming out of hibernation in British Columbia and officials say they’re hungry and will do anything for food. The B.C. Conservation Officer Service says roadsides are a favourite spot for bears, but he says that can be risky for the animals and motorists. He says people should give the bears room and not stop to watch them. Officials say they always get an increase in bear-human conflict calls at this time of year.

———

Join the conversation

Please read our commenting policies