The fourth oldest building in Halifax has been moved from the south to the north end of the city in an effort to save it from the landfill.

It was an arduous task moving 249-year-old Morris House from the south to the north end of the city, 4.5-kilometer and lasting 33.5 hours started around 3 a.m. Satuday.

“One of the things we’re hoping to do with this project is to illustrate that just because a building is 249-years-old, it’s not necessary to throw it in the landfill,” Heritage Trust’s Beverly Miller told News 95.7.

The house was originally on the lot of Nova Scotia Power on Lower Water Street. It paused overnight at Brunswick and Cogwell streets.

The crew from S. Rushton Construction Ltd., of New Glasgow, used two front-end loaders to pulled the massive building onto the lot at the corner of Charles and Creighton Streets at 12:30 p.m. Sunday.

The Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia is the present owner of the building and is donating it to Metro Non-Profit Housing Association. Other key partners in the project are the Ecology Action Centre and the Ark.

“At the same time, (we are) making sure it’s energy efficient and will be sustainable to operate,” said Miller.

At its new site, the house will be repaired and extended, to provide affordable housing for nine young adults.